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Brecht

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Writer: Delia Baskerville

Year: 12 Level: 7 Duration: 11 lessons

Rationale:

This unit of work is designed to impact on students' academic, social and personal lives. This focal point aims to provide opportunities for the cooperative creation of artistic work where students are able to experience focused conversations that facilitate the collaborative sharing of ideas. For this purpose (and to cultivate the values embedded in the school curriculum) the focus of this unit is on providing opportunities for students to generate, refine, express ideas within the context of political theatre.

Values

(Teachers please insert the values your school have agreed to and identified).

Key Competencies

Participating and contributing: This meaning making process provides opportunities for students to communicate ideas as a whole class, in small groups and to reflect with a "learning buddy group". In this way, they are supported to: work responsibly; meet deadlines; synthesise cognitive, sensory and emotive forms of thinking as they use their imagination to explore ideas, experience transformative understanding through reflection and shared lived experiences of political theatre, and recognise options for social change. Students are able to experience the shared power of reciprocal learning and build positive, whanau-type relationships by playing purposefully and working with others.

Achievement Objectives: Level 7

The students will:

Understanding the Arts in Context (UC)

Research the purposes of production, performance, and technologies of drama in a range of contexts, including NZ drama.

Developing Practical Knowledge (PK)

Select and refine the use of techniques, conventions and technologies in specific dramatic forms.

Communicating and Interpreting (CI)

Rehearse and perform works in a range of dramatic forms. Respond to and make critical judgements about rehearsal processes and performances.

Keywords

Epic theatre, Bertholt Brecht, gesture, alienation technique, narration and, participating and contributing.

 

Summative Assessment:

There are two summative assessment opportunities in this group:

Firstly teacher observation of class: individual student participation, and group contributions in the performance of Epic Theatre. This unit of work provides the rich teaching and learning required to assess AS 90302 (2.4). The activity Poverty and Politics supports internal assessment for AS 90302 (2.4).

Secondly, a portfolio that reflects on class activities, student participation in relation to the skills, knowledge, understanding and attitudes gained and justifies and explains their group decisions through the process.

Resources/ Materials:

For this unit the teacher supplies:

  1. Photographs, poems, music and stories of Parihaka. (For example: CD: Parihaka: The Art of Passive Resistance (MMT 2033).
  2. Cartoons: The identified cartoons in this unit were retrieved from Alexander Turnbull National Library.
  3. Selected scenes from Mother Courage by Bertholt Brecht.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this unit students will be able to participate and contribute by -
LO1: working cooperatively to meet challenges, and express and make sense of ideas
LO2: demonstrating knowledge of political epic theatre form with reference to Mother Courage by Brecht
LO3: annotating your script and reflecting through the process show how the features were used in performance.

Elements Role Focus Action Tension Time and Space Techniques Voice Gesture Movement Conventions Wall of fame Reflective circle Narration Song Mirroring
Teaching Learning Sequence Key Questions to Guide Formative Assessment

Lesson One:

Learning Intention (LI):
We are learning to participate and contribute, refining ideas to dramatise a political event.
Success criteria (SC):
We will now this when we have performed the story to the class.
Prior knowledge:Questions are asked to ascertain the knowledge we bring to this unit of work.

Wall of fame: We read the poems, stories and look at the pictures that are on the walls in our space whilst listening to the lyrics of Tim Finn's Parihaka. We read out loud to one another beginning with facts ( The Story of Parihaka ).

We discuss how this story might be used as a drama to convey a political message against the crown regarding the Treaty of Waitangi Settlements and care of our people.

As a class we decide what scenes are required, where the scenes are changing and discuss how we use signs to relay this important information. We decide what these signs actually relay.

Group Tasks : Group tasks are delegated. We discuss the order these might be performed. We work in groups to devise our drama.

Performance: We perform our drama.

Closure: Think Pair Share: A question is placed on OHT:
If I was to call this political theatre and my intention was to influence a change in the thinking of the audience, explain how your work today might achieve this?

Reflective circle:What are you beginning to think political theatre is? Facing out, think about the question. We turn inwards when ready to share our ideas. When we are all ready (facing in) one person is appointed to start and the direction to move in.

Prior knowledge exemplar question:
What do you know of the events of the Parihaka protest?
What is Epic Theatre?

How do we portray a political message in drama?

 

 

In what ways might we achieve our intention of explaining the historical significance of oppression in NZ?

 

 

 

If I was to call this political theatre and my intention was to influence a change in the thinking of the audience, explain how your work today might achieve this?

What are you beginning to think political theatre is?

 

 

Journal Reflection: In what ways did I participate in drama today and contribute to my group work?

Lesson Two:

Learning Intention (LI):
We are learning to participate and contribute to devising
and performing an issue as a political message.
Success criteria (SC):
We will know this when we present, respond to and made critical judgements about group performances.

Recap: Questions are asked to broaden our understanding of political theatre.

Interviews: Students in groups of five brainstorm current, relevant, pertinent life issues. One issue is selected to explore. Decide as a group why this issue is important and how it affects the lives of young New Zealanders today.

Devising: Discuss how we will use the following structure to present this issue as a political message to the class.

Each group performance includes the following:

  1. one student narrating rather than acting the story.
  2. three students playing characters, who at some stage interrupt the action, step outside of character and further explain the circumstances / characters to the audience.
  3. three alternative endings.

Presentation: Students present their drama to their "learning buddy" group and receive feedback regarding:

  • The effectiveness of narration and actors stepping out of role to achieve their political intention?
  • The impact of playing several different endings
  • One thing the group could improve to make this a more effective political message.

Group reflection:
Discuss the alterations that need to be made to acknowledge feedback we have received.

Closure: Pair share: What do we need to consider when effectively conveying a political message through drama?
Reflective circle: In what ways might we bring about social change through drama?

 

 

 

 

 

Recap questions: When have you seen (used) a narrator convention?
When have you seen (created) stereotypical characters?
When working in drama in what ways have you seen (used) a distance frame? Why (and when) have you seen alternate endings used in theatre?

What is an issue that affects your everyday life?
Why is it an important teenage issue?
What aspects of this issue would you want to tell / educate NZ society about?
Why would you want to present a political message to an audience?

What is the political message you want to present to your audience?

How do these features help structure your political message?
In what ways did the narrator (and actors stepping out of role) effectively hammer home your political message and keep the audience removed from the action?
In what ways did the playing of different endings impact on the audience perception of potential different outcomes and social change?

What do we need to change in our drama to reflect the opinions of others? One person will be chosen to report back to class on progress tomorrow.

 

 

What features did you use to explore some issues relevant to your lives?

Journal entry: In what ways were our group members actively (and effectively) involved in devising and presenting a political message?

Lesson Three:

LI: We are learning to collaborate to rehearse and perform an issue as a political message.
SC:We will know this when we have performed, responded to and made critical judgements of our group performances.

Recap:
Each group report their progress to the class.

Objective. We have 15 minutes to rehearse our drama incorporating the feedback we received last lesson.

Performance: Each group performs their work.

Class Discussion: The students' performances are critiqued regarding:

  • The effectiveness of student narration and actors stepping out of role to achieve the political intention?
  • The impact of playing several different endings.

General discussion:
From the groups we saw discuss the most effective use of the following features in relaying a political message -

  • Narrator to inform
  • Person who steps outside the action to comment on historical significance.
  • The mime.

Class Discussion:What effect did these features have on the audience perception of the issues?

Closure: Pair share:How are we able to present our issues in a way that has political relevance and influence and change audience perceptions?

Reflective circle:
What drama devises might we use to raise audience awareness of issues in our lives?

 

 

What alterations are you making to reflect peer feedback?

 

When did you witness effective narration? What do you base this judgment on?
What impact does character interruption of the story have on the audience?
In what ways do different endings impact on the audience perception of this issue? What did acrobatic movement symbolise?

 

How might we improve our presentations to make them stronger political messages?
What are you beginning to think political theatre is?

 

How are we able to present our issues in a way that has political relevance and influence and change audience perceptions?

 

Journal: What roles and responsibilities were we actively contributing to group work today?

Lesson Four:

LI: We are learning to draw together to identify the features of Epic Theatre.
SC:We will know this when we have collectively collated a list of the features.

OHT - A picture of Brecht.

Prior Knowledge: Identify our understanding of whom he is and the historical events during his working life.

In pairs we look at internet for 20 minutes to answer our specific focus questions around who Bertholt Brecht was and what was happening in Germany at this time.
Each pair is to sum up each of the ideas in one or two sentences as you work through the data.

Film extracts shown to set the time of Brecht in context.

Discussion: We discuss our findings and collate a list of the features of Epic Theatre.

Closure: Pair Share: What features do I understand and use confidently to convey a political message?

Reflective circle: We each respond to:
What have I learned about political theatre today?

 

 

Prior knowledge questions:
Who is this man? What was happening at the time of his working life? What influences has he had on twentieth century theatre?

 

Who is Brecht? What is Epic Theatre? What is Brecht's philosophy on political theatre? What was happening in Germany at the time of Brecht? What is Brecht trying to achieve by using alienation?

What did you notice about Brecht's work?

What have we found out about Brecht, his world and his idea of theatre?

Journal Entry for Homework:
In what ways did I create opportunities for others to learn?
In what ways did I participate and contribute to our class list of features of Epic Theatre?

Features of Epic theatre (and deadlines) are delegated for students to further research.

Lesson Five:

LI: We are learning to participate in a new context and use features of Epic Theatre to alienate actors and distance the audience.
SC: We will know this when we have incorporated the features into a scene of Mother Courage.

Flying in five strategy: Cartoon. We read and write a reaction to Asia Bird Flu cartoon in our journals. This cartoon refers to the bird flu that was first found in Asia and spread slowly across the world.

Discuss: OHT Brecht - Talk about Brecht explaining his philosophy on theatre of politics.
The key to Brecht's work is the idea of alienation or estrangement. He explained that this meant dramatising characters and situations in new and surprising ways so that actors and audiences are aware that they are involved in a play that has a special message. Creating Drama. Burton. B. P171.

Mother Courage Photo - OHT. Discuss their impression of this photograph. What message is Brecht conveying in this photograph?

Alienation Technique was used by Brecht to cause the audience to-

  • be distanced from the piece of theatre.
  • Critically analyse the events.
  • Receive a report of past events.

Students read text from Page 19 Performance as a shared reading.

Discussion: OHT: The Actor . Brecht required his actors to demonstrate what happened. To demonstrate the words and the actions of the character. They must not try and become any of the characters they betray. At no time should the actor or the audience identify with the character. Brecht encourages his actors to show their characters rather than being wholly transformed into their parts.

Group work: We experiment for 20 minutes with the Mother Courage text in the following way.

  • Perform with an awareness of being watched.
  • Look at the floor and openly calculate movements.
  • Separate voice from movement so that words and gestures do not coordinate.
  • Remain uninvolved with other actors physically and emotionally.
  • Make their own movements on stage when it suits them.
  • Deliberately act towards specific groups in the audience
  • Speak their lines as if they were in quotation marks
  • Directly address the audience - address the audience from centre stage in full front presentational position to interrupt the action of the play to explain or narrate the events.
  • Occasionally speech stage directions aloud to intensify unemotional acting.
  • Be critical of the character - as though all of the actions had occurred in the past.
  • Change roles - change roles with other actors during rehearsals to remain unattached to any role.
  • Stand in front of a mirror and meticulously study your movements and gestures.
  • Use robotic mechanical dreamlike and other non- realistic techniques, movements and voice.
  • Use opposite styles of acting such as a serious death scene in an outrageous comedy style.

Students rehearse their scene incorporating the above actor techniques. They present it to one other group who provides feedback on:

  • The effectiveness of their use of alienation techniques.
  • One aspect of the performance they could improve.

Class discussion:How are these actor techniques effective in alienating the actors and distancing the actors from the action of the play?

Closure: Pair share:What experience/s provided new contexts for you to confidently participate in distancing yourself from the action in the scene today?

Reflective circle:In what ways does the distancing frame contribute to theatre being political?

 

What political message am I reading from this cartoon?

What impact does a distance frame have on the audience?

 

 

What political message are you reading from this picture of Mother Courage Brecht?

 

Acknowledge individual research topics:
What do you know of Brecht's work with actors to demonstrate rather than feel their roles?

 

 

How do Brecht's and Stanislavski expectation's of theirs actors differ?

 

 

 

How are these actor techniques effective in alienating the actors and distancing the audience from the action of the play?

 

 

 

 

How did the feature of alienating the actor from their role effect your interpretation of the text?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journal entry:
How did the feature of alienating the actor from their role effect your interpretation of the text? Refer specifically to the text when writing your answer. Annotate your findings on your text, to indicate where you have specifically used these features of Epic Theatre.

In what ways is my confidence to participate and contribute to group work in this new context growing?

Lesson Six:

LI: We are learning to use voice techniques to alienate actors and audience.
SC:We will know this when we have responded, participated and contributed critical judgements about the effective use of Brechtian voice techniques.

Flying in five strategy: Cartoon. We read and write a reaction in our journals to No I'm not breaking back in! This cartoon refers to findings that prison is the preferred home of some criminals. In the past two years nearly 120 prisoners on home detention requested to return to jail.

Explain the feature alienation in terms of voice using the following:

Voice. Brecht made enormous vocal demands on his actors. They were required to sing, chant, use mechanical and strange sounding voices, produce disconnected and non-human sounds and speak in a range of dialects and class accents. These techniques are used to produce alienation.

Group work: Using our Mother Courage Text practice our scene in the following ways:

  1. Believable human realistic delivery.
  2. A variety of accents: (English, Irish, Italian, Indian, American, broad NZ).
  3. A variety of class distinctions (British Royalty, Common Cockney, southern hillbilly etc.)
  4. Robot or mechanical.
  5. Dreamlike.
  6. Singing, chanting and intonation.
  7. Opposite emotional values from those that seem apparent in the speech.

Fishbowl: One group volunteers to work on this scene in front of the class. The scene is played and critiqued. We further direct the scene in ways that effectively incorporate these vocal demands Brecht made of his actors. Photos are taken. Individuals select photos to reflect on in their journals.

Discussion:In what ways do these voice techniques reinforce Brecht's alienation of the actors and audience?

Reflection:What have I learned about an actor's use of voice in alienating actors and audience from the action of the play?

 

What political message am I reading from this cartoon?

Acknowledge individual research topics:
What vocal demands did Brecht make on his actors to produce the alienation effect?

 

 

In what ways do the voice techniques reinforce Epic Theatre's alienation of the actors and audience?

 

Journaling: We make notes around each of these exercises to critique our work.

In what ways was this exercise effective in alienating the actor from the action of the play?

How did these voice techniques effect the actor's interpretation of the text?

What happens to the voice when we deliver lines in an opposing way to the emotional value of the text?

How were these vocal techniques effective in alienating the actors and distancing the audience from the action of the play?
What vocal demands did Brecht make on his actors to produce alienation?

In what ways do these voice techniques reinforce Brecht's alienation of the actors and audience?

Journal reflection:
What does this photo highlight with regard to challenges you experienced during this activity.
In what ways did I connect with other group members when rehearsing our scene in different ways? How did these interactions impact on my sense of belonging to this group?

Lesson Seven:

LI: We are learning to use stylised movement and gesture to contradict emotional feeling
SC:We will know this when we have made critical judgements about the features of epic Theatre

Flying in five strategy: Cartoon. We read and write a reaction in our journals to the cartoon That should stitch up the youth vote which refers to English's and Bog's attempt to capture the youth vote.

Recap: What have we learnt so far about Brecht's alienation technique?

Introduce today's lesson with the use of the following OHT -
Gesture Brecht was influenced by Japanese and Chinese Theatre. He admired the way they used movement to tell a story in a stylised unemotional way. He encouraged his actors to learn the formal gestures of Chinese Theatre and to use them in a completely detached way as though they were doing exercises or watching themselves in a mirror. In Chinese theatre a gesture that shows that character is crying is moving the finger up and down in front of the eyes. Brecht encouraged his actors to use this gesture instead of actually weeping tears.

Mirroring: In pairs, invent gestures to epitomise the following actions (crying, laughing, fearful, estatic, bullying), and practice these mirroring each other and varying the pace. Create smooth transitions so others cannot detect who is leading.

Sharing: Join with another pair, and share work. Give feedback that encourages movement in a stylised, unemotional way.

Pantomimic dramatisation: Using the scene from Mother Courage invent movement, gestures and pantomimic dramatisation to accommodate each of the vocal deliveries used in the voice exercises. These are viewed with their learning buddy group who take photographs of the work. Individuals select a photo to reflect on in their journal.

Reflection: Pair share: Look at the photograph and discuss the ways in which gesture has been used to distance the actor from the emotion

Reflective circle:What have I learnt about using gesture to distance myself from the emotional content of a scene?

What am I reading into this cartoon?

 

Prior knowledge questions.
What is stylised movement?
How does slow motion impact on gesture?
What do you know about Chinese Theatre?

Acknowledge individual research topics: How and why does Brecht use gesture in Epic Theatre?

What am I learning about alienation?

What do we need to be thinking about in order to use gesture in a way that contradicts the emotional feeling in the moment?

Journaling: What do we need to do to make gestures stylised?

What impact does varying the pace have on gesture?

What have you learned about the effective use of pace when creating stylised gestures?

What emotions might be present?
What stylised gestures could we invent to distance ourselves from these emotions?

Use the photograph for reflection:
In what ways does gesture contradict the emotional feeling in this moment?

Journal entry: Annotate the Mother Courage script where you have used the feature of gesture.
In what ways did I support others in my group to participate confidently? Illustrate with specific examples.

Lesson Eight:

LI: We are learning to contribute collaboratively to rehearse and perform a scene in Epic Theatre style
SC:We will know this when we have used responded and critically analysed the effective use of the features of Epic Theatre in a scene

Cartoon On OHT. We read and write a reaction in our journals to the cartoon Milking time. This cartoon refers to the success of the dairy industry over the past year and the notion that public money has helped access it.

Introduce today's lesson with the use of the following OHT :
Narration. Parts of the play are narrated rather than acting them. Most of Brecht's plays made use of a screen or large notices somewhere on or above the stage. The screen or notices gave the audience information about the play, introduced scenes or commented on the action, hammering home the message of the play.

Where video projection is not available placards are used. Actors come on to stage carrying placards that announce the time and place of the action or any other information. These signs underline Brecht's message and keep the audience removed from the action.

Film extract: Re-watch a play extract to see how this feature of Brecht's work was used.

Discussion:In what ways are placards used effectively in theatre of politics?

Scene: Using placards to enrich the Epic Theatre interpretation of the scene from Mother Courage, quickly make placards that -

  • introduce the scene
  • give the audience information about the scene,
  • hammer home the message.

Rehearsal: Students rehearse their scene for 20 minutes incorporating Brechtian Techniques of alienation we have used thus far, as well as the placards. Again photographs are taken and we each select one to reflect on in our journals.

Feedback: The class view their learning buddy group scene and give feedback on -

  • the effectiveness of the placards
  • recognisable Brechtian techniques, and
  • one aspect of the scene they could improve.

Class discussion: In what ways are the features of placards and narration effective in conveying a political message?
Closure: Pair share: What is challenging and inspiring about Epic Theatre?

In what ways is my improved reading of political messages in cartoons improving my discussions of them outside class?

Prior knowledge questions:
When and why have you seen or used narration in a play?
How did this feel as an audience member?

Acknowledge individual research topics: How does Brecht use narrators and placards in Epic Theatre?

Where in real life have you seen placards used?

 

Why are placards used in political demonstrations?

 

What did you notice about Brecht's use of placards?

 

What political message do we want to convey?
What information do we want the audience to understand so we influence their thinking?

 

What hindrances occurred when using the placards?

 

Using a photograph to reflect:
In what ways are the features of Epic Theatre evident in this photograph?

What am I noticing about:

  • the effective use of placards?
  • the narrator's role in Epic Theatre?

How have these features helped us convey a political message?

Journal Entry:
Annotate your Mother Courage script to indicate where you have used narration and signs to convey your political message.
In what ways did I make connections with others during our group work today?

Lesson Nine:

LI: We are learning to research, critically reflect and refine ideas to develop a scene from Mother Courage
SC:We will know this when have refined a song to convey our political message

Cartoon On OHT. We read and write a reaction in our journals to the cartoon 'Til divorce do us part.

Introduce today's lesson with the use of the following OHT :-
Use of Song. Characters frequently and suddenly burst into song or formal commentary. Characters often become grotesque and unreal. They sing a song that is nothing to do with the emotion of action and everything to do with the intellectual message or performing in a dehumanised robotic manner. The songs broke the mood or action of the scene and actors were reminding the audience that they were watching a play that had a message. Sometimes the actors actually stepped out of character and sang songs directly to the audience.

Discussion: As a class recap on the scenes so far. What are the messages Brecht is trying to convey to the audience? Read the scene synopsis and brainstorm the kind of songs that would be relevant in this context. In groups, discuss where a song could be placed in the scene from Mother Courage

Fishbowl: We choose one scene to interpret and incorporate a song to convey the intellectual message. Brainstorm what is the intellectual message we want to convey through song. What existing music could we use? We all participate in the composition of a song and give direction to further interpret this scene.

Pair Share:How effective is song in conveying a political message?

Group work: Brainstorm ideas for music and lyrics to compose a song that would explain our intellectual ideas for the Mother Courage scene we are interpreting?

Presentation: As a group present and clarify your idea to the class.

Closure: Pair share:What are we thinking about in regard to the features of Epic Theatre used to alienate actors and the audience from the emotional content of the play?

What political message is conveyed through this cartoon?

For what purposes have we seen song used in theatre?

Acknowledge individual research topics: How does Brecht use song as a feature of Epic Theatre.

 

What aspects of the message (and existing music) could we use to create a song that may shock our audience and reinforce our political message?

 

 

What is the intellectual message we want to convey?

 

 

What existing music could we use? Would any of our childhood nursery rhymes work?
What is our message?
Who would be keen to try and sing our message?

 

 

Journal: How was our idea received? How will this song strengthen our political message?
How are these features enhancing our interpretation of a scene from Mother Courage?
Annotate your Mother Courage script to indicate where you have used song to convey your political message.
What opportunities did I have to contribute to group work today that advanced our interpretation of Mother Courage?

Lesson Ten:

LI: We are learning to devise different outcomes for our scene
SC:We will know this when we present a scene with three different endings

Cartoon On OHT: We read and write a reaction in our journals to the cartoon Poor old Brash

Introduce today's lesson with the use of the following OHT :-

Different endings. Actors retell the story of the play with several different endings. If the audience is shown a tragic ending, a happy ending and maybe even an absurd ending then the point that different outcomes are possible is made. The ending does not have to be inevitable and there is a possibility for social change.

Brainstorm: In groups brainstorm three ideas for different endings for our scenes: tragic, happy and absurd.

Rehearsal: Students are asked to rehearse the scene with three different endings. They are given 25 minutes to rehearse.

Viewing: Groups present their three different endings to their learning buddy group.

Discussion: What impact did the different endings have on our work?

Closure: Pair share:In what ways did our different endings influence our interpretation of the scene?

What political message is conveyed through this cartoon?

Acknowledge individual research topics: Why does Brecht use the feature of different endings in Epic Theatre?

 

What is a tragic ending?
What constitutes a happy ending?
What do we understand to be absurd?

 

What message for social change (in our scene) do we want to give to our audience?

 

What struggles and successes did we experience during rehearsal time?

In what ways were these ending distinctive from one another?
When we viewed this scene were we aware of the social change the actors wanted us to make?

How are effective messages for social change conveyed?

Journal Entry: In what ways is your sense of belonging to this group developing? Give specific examples to illustrate your perceptions.

Lesson Eleven:

LI: We are learning to explore and use technologies in ways that reflect the Epic Theatre form.
SC:We will know this when we report our findings to our "buddy learning group".

Cartoon On OHT: We read and write a reaction in our journals to the cartoon air NZ and Origin Pacific

OHT : Displayed and discussed:

Your objective is to provoke examination of the social issues and raise questions for the audience. You must frequently increase the spectators' awareness of being in the theatre by revealing your total consciousness in performing your role. In theory your audience will concentrate on ideas and action rather than on emotion and character. Brecht and Epic Style Page 307.

Film extract: Revisit the Brecht film extract and notice the use of objects, costume, and lighting to distance the audience from reality on stage. Discuss these observations as a class: see the supportive notes .

Group work: Brainstorm how we will use objects, costume, and lighting to support our ideas and actions. We plan where these will be used in our scene.

Rehearsal: We rehearse their scene incorporating these features into our current work.

Report: We report our progress to our learning buddy group.

Group Reflection: What impact is our learning buddy group feedback having on our interpretation of a scene?

Closure: In what ways do objects, costume and lighting enhance our examination of social issues in a scene?

What political message is conveyed through this cartoon?

 

 

In what ways is our work building to support this statement?

 

 

How has Brecht used objects, costume, and lighting to raise questions for the audience?
What questions were raised for you?

 

What objects could we use to heighten audience awareness of our social issue?
How might we use costume creatively to ensure the audience concentrate on the action?
What questions do we want to raise for the audience through our use of lighting?

 

What progress have we made today towards provoking audience examination of our social issue?

 

Journal entry:
Annotate your Mother Courage script to indicate where you have used objects, costume and lighting to convey your political message.

Lesson Twelve and Thirteen

LI: We are learning to perform a scene that reflects the Features of Epic Theatre.
SC:We will know this when we have received feedback and critically reflected on the appropriate use of the chosen features

Rehearsal: we rehearse our scenes for 30 minutes.

Peer feedback: Our learning buddy group give us feedback regarding the effective, appropriate use of the features of Epic Theatre in our scene.

Presentation: Each group presents their work to the class and receives feedback regarding:

  • the effective use of Brechtian Techniques to alienate the actors and the audience.
  • The appropriate use of Brechtian Techniques to convey a political message to promote social change

Discussion:Identify and discuss the important features of theatre of politics.

Journal Entry:What have I learned about the features of Epic Theatre?

 

What features of Epic theatre are we incorporating into our scenes today?

 

What struggles and successes did we experience during rehearsal today?

 

What changes do we need to make to incorporate our learning buddy group feedback into the interpretation of our scene?

 

Journal Entry:
In what ways might I improve my participation in class and group activities?
How might I contribute more effectively during another learning process?

Students are ready for assessment using AS 90302 (AS 2.4) Poverty and Politics  
Teaching/Learning Reflection
What went well? What needs to change? Where to next
     

Al Nisbet Cartoons to Support this Unit

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library , Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any reuse of the following images.

  1. [Air NZ and Origin Pacific]. Al Nisbet, 10 September, 2005;(DCDL-0002623)
  2. Busker's Festival. "Poor old Brash...Still working on his balancing act!" Al Nisbet, 22 January, 2005;(DCDL-0004809)
  3. Asia. Bird Flu. Al Nisbet, 1 March, 2005;(DCDL-0004849)
  4. "No! I'm breaking back in! With three good meals and free gym membership, can ya blame me?" Al Nisbet, 12 August, 2005;(DCDL-0005482)
  5. "Milking time!" Al Nisbet, 5 February, 2008;(DCDL-0005286)
  6. "And do you agree to split assets, time-share children, 'til divorce do you part?" Al Nisbet, 6 October, 2004;(DCDL-0004949)
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