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Rock It Man

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Writer: Chris Archer

Years 11 Curriculum Level 6 NCEA Level 1

AIM:

The aim of this unit is to foster the ability of students to inquire and reflect on their own and others' values (moral, social, cultural, aesthetic and economic) and appreciate artistic diversity through the analysis of a selection of New Zealand contemporary rock and popular music from a range of styles and genres. Students will also investigate the historical, social and cultural contexts in which the music was written and performed. They will also consider and reflect on how the music studied may influence their own music creating and making.

DURATION:

20 lessons (approximately)

SUMMARY OF UNIT FOCUSING QUESTIONS:
  • What kinds of expression (e.g. personal and group identities, values, musical, extra-musical) are found in rock/popular music culture?
  • How does New Zealand's rock and popular music reflect the cultural diversity (as found in our different cultures, languages and heritages), values and traditions of our inhabitants?
  • How will analysing a range of songs from various genres/styles help us to appreciate music more and make us more reflective in our own music creating and making?
  • How can examining Kiwi rock/popular music help us to learn about our own and others' values?
  • What processes do we need to learn about to be able to critically evaluate sources of information that will help build our understanding of rock/popular music in New Zealand?
SUMMARY OF UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Students will:

  • Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand music.
  • Reflect on the power/influence of music in helping us to learn about our own and others' values.
  • Identify features of music (from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music history) that could be described as particularly 'Kiwi flavoured."
  • Listen to, view, read about, research and analyse a range of New Zealand rock/popular music from several eras to gain a broad knowledge of the development of New Zealand music.
  • Consider the knowledge and processes needed to be able to evaluate sources of information that will help build more in-depth understanding of New Zealand rock/popular music.
  • Explain the main musical features of music (in rock and popular songs) from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music history.
  • Identify key repertoire and artists from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music history.
  • Describe the performance styles of a performer/s from a selected era in New Zealand rock/popular music history.
  • Consider relationships between rock music, arts, fashion, industry, culture and society in New Zealand from particular eras and share ideas about how identity is expressed in popular culture.
  • Share ideas about how New Zealand rock and popular music reflects the cultural diversity, values and traditions found here.
  • Analyse the elements and features of selected New Zealand rock/popular songs considering beat/tempo, speed/feel, tone colours, rhythm, melody, key, compositional devices, from/structure, mood/impact/meaning and production techniques.
  • Apply knowledge of the features and stylistic conventions of a range of New Zealand rock and popular music through an integration of aural perception and practical and theoretical skills.
  • Recall (sing or play back, and/or notate) rhythm patterns, without syncopation, of four bars length in simple time (2/4, 3/4 or 4/4).
  • Recall (sing back or play back, and/or notate) melodies of four bars length in a major key.
  • Identify (orally or in written form) chords I, IV, V and VI in a major key.
  • Present a case study from one category of New Zealand music, one aspect of case study in detail, and an individual profile of one musician from the case study.
  • Consider how new learnings from this unit of work may helps us to interpret music with depth and provide models for future music creating and making.
ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES: MUSIC - SOUND ARTS
Understanding Music - Sound Arts in Context

Students will:

  • Level 6: analyse music from a range of sound environments, styles, and genres, in relation to historical, social, and cultural contexts.
  • Level 6: consider and reflect on the influence of music in their own music making and in their lives.
Communicating and Interpreting in Music - Sound Arts Students will:
  • Level 6: reflect on the expressive qualities of music and evaluate their own and others' music, both live and recorded.
Developing Practical Knowledge in Music - Sound Arts

Students will:

  • Level 6: apply knowledge of expressive features, stylistic conventions, and technologies through an integration of aural perception and practical and theoretical skills and describe how they are used in a range of music.

ACTIVITY ONE (2-3 lessons)

ACTIVITY TWO (4-5 lessons)

ACTIVITY THREE (6-8 lessons)

ACTIVITY FOUR (4-5 periods)

KEY TERMINOLOGY

Students may want to add their won definitions to the following terms:

Term Definition
elements and musical features Elements are the key ingredients of music (e.g. beat, rhythm, pitch, tempo, tone colour or timbre, dynamics). Composers feature these in distinctive and unique ways in their compositions.
musical features/characteristics The way that composers use the elements and language of music is distinctive and therefore their music often displays particular musical features or characteristics that are 'fingerprints' of their style.
performance style The performance conventions that are associated with a particular style of music and that affect how a musical work is interpreted and presented.
compositional devices Devices used in constructing a piece of music (e.g. motif, phrase, sequence, repetition, variation, cadence).
genre A broad category of music (e.g., rock, jazz, choral music); or a particular type of music that has a tradition or history and is identifiable by specific characteristics (e.g. the sonata, rock opera)
SUMMARY OF KEY COMPETENCIES EMBEDDED IN UNIT
Thinking Consider the kinds of values that are expressed through rock/popular music in New Zealand and how this contributes to a wider understanding of the music. Consider how personal experiences and challenges to our own personal values system can be a stimulus for creative thought and action. Consider personal goals in music and how the knowledge shared and built upon in this unit may be integrated into own personal practice, identity and expertise.
Participating and contributing Consider how sharing ideas with others helps to build our own perspectives. Consider how respecting other people's ideas builds our capacity to listen more intently, recognise different points of view and negotiate solutions. Consider how the way we relate to others in discussion can challenge our own thinking and lead to new approaches, ideas and ways of thinking.
Using language, symbols, and texts Consider how lyrics and music combine to express and communicate ideas, emotions and experiences. Consider how the language of music and its symbolic representation are to communicate musical understandings. Consider how choice of musical language can affect the way people feel and relate to music. Consider how music can help us to tap into experiences, thoughts and actions and help us to make meaning in our lives.
Managing self Consider readiness for assessment, particularly US 18816, deciding in consultation with the teacher, preparation and readiness for playback aural tasks. Consider how we set personal goals, make work plans and manage our time to meet work goals in order to achieve and experience success. Consider the effectiveness of the strategies we devise to help us reach our goals and our disposition to ask for help and support from our peers and teachers when we need to.
Relating to others Consider our ability to effectively listen to what others say in and through their music to help us recognise other ways of being. Consider how we share ideas with our peers, which can lead to the creation of new understandings, approaches and ideas.
RESOURCES

Print

  • New Zealand Music Industry Commission & Ministry of Education. (2002, 2004). Sweet: A Taste of New Zealand Music, and Sweet II: Another Taste of New Zealand Music. (Book, CD, poster, and CD-ROM).
  • New Zealand Music Industry Commission & Ministry of Education (2005). Making Music: Te Puoro: New Zealand musicians play their songs and talk about their work. (Book and videos).
  • New Zealand Music Industry Commission (2004). Give it a Whirl. Wellington: Learning Media. (Book, videos and DVD).
  • Peter, S. (Ed.). (2007). The Little Black Kiwi Songbook. Victoria: Wise Publications.
  • Dix, J. (2005). Stranded in paradise: New Zealand rock and roll 1955 to the modern era, Auckland: Penguin.
  • Eggleton, D. (2003). Ready to fly: the story of New Zealand rock music. Nelson: Craig Potton Publishing.
  • Spittle, G. (1997). Counting the beat: a history of New Zealand song. Wellington: GP Publications.
  • Staff, B., Ashley, S. (2002). For the record: a history of the recording industry in New Zealand. Auckland: David Bateman.

Web Resources

School/Community Resources

Other Resources

TEACHER BACKGROUND READING

ONGOING ASSESSMENT TOWARDS ACHIEVING AS90017

ONGOING ASSESSMENT TOWARDS ACHIEVING US18816

EVALUATION
Next Learning Steps

Students might:

  • Perform a selection of rock/popular music in groups, contributing evidence towards AS90013
  • Transcribe a selection of rock/popular music in preparation for AS 90015
  • Study scores from a selection of rock/popular music in preparation for AS 90016
  • Increase their knowledge of the music industry in New Zealand and prepare for US 12832
  • Recreate a cover version of a selection of rock/popular music studied in the unit in preparation for US 20747
  • Choose a rock/popular song studied during that unit and create an instrumental version
  • Compare and contrast a selection of New Zealand rock/popular music with similar genres originating from Australia, Britain or the USA
Strengths Further Development

Evaluate delivery strategies that worked effectively
To be completed by the teacher

Evaluate learning experiences that worked well
To be completed by the teacher

Identify delivery strategies to revise or implement
To be completed by the teacher

Identify learning experiences that need development
To be completed by the teacher

Identification of students: Use assessment information to identify students underperforming, and those who could be challenged further.
Students/groups Strategies to meet student needs:

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

To be completed by the teacher

 

 

Moderation Feedback

To be completed by the teacher once a moderation report for any of the standards has been received.

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