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New Zealand Case Studies in Effective Utilisation of ICT in Arts Learning

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by Project Leader Merryn Dunmill

In 2006 the New Zealand Ministry of Education contracted Te Puna Puoru National Centre for Research in Music Education and Sound Arts (University of Canterbury) to project lead a professional development, action-research programme in a small cluster of primary and intermediate schools in the Canterbury region. The aim of the programme was to support teachers and students to select, utilize and develop digital resources in the teaching and learning of visual arts and music for improved educational outcomes. This Professional Development project complemented another two Ministry projects in ICT and the Arts (2006): A Scoping of Digital Resources to Support Arts Learning; and a Review of Literature on the Impact of ICT on Arts Learning. Both of these projects influenced the design and outcomes of this PD project in that they informed the participants about the positive impact of ICT on student motivation and engagement, and helped guide teachers to relevant sites that would support their teaching and learning programmes.

The schools were approached by the Research Centre at the University of Canterbury to participate in the programme because they had all previously been involved in both ICT and Arts professional development programmes operating out of Teacher Support Services at the Christchurch College of Education. School Principals, in consultation with the project leader and their own staff, agreed contractually to participation in the programme. Human Ethics approval was sought and granted by the University of Canterbury to ensure research procedures were adhered to and that permissions were gained from teachers, parents and students alike for their participation and for publication of materials produced in the programme.

Two National Facilitators in the Arts, who also worked as local music and visual arts advisors, participated in the professional development programme by working with the teachers at the contracted schools to support their arts teaching. They had worked with these teachers in previous Arts professional development programmes and had built strong professional relationships prior to this project.

The various classroom programmes were negotiated and planned in term 1, both individually and collectively with all participating schools. They were further refined and developed in term 2 again, individually and collectively. Implementation of the units generally took place in terms 3 and 4 and included shared reflections through face-to-face meetings, online e-journals, and video conferencing. Throughout the programme, action research supported reflective practice and allowed for refinements based on reflections. Teachers were given funded release time to plan, search sites and experiment with software, and to attend whole day meetings where progress and ideas were shared with all involved. Readings and key findings from both the Literature Review and the Scoping Project were shared with participants at focus group meetings for the PD project. At times, selected students attended these whole day meetings so that their views and creative work could be shared with others.

Throughout the year the two arts advisors worked alongside the teachers and their students providing expert advice on planning and pedagogy for improved arts learning outcomes. Other expert support was provided through the South Learning Centre staff and by community artists who shared their experience and knowledge of ICT and/or Arts during sessions run in the computer suite at the South Learning Centre, or through visits to galleries, or �special guest� visits to the classroom.

Music Advisor Celia Stewart

In 2006 the New Zealand Ministry of Education contracted Te Puna Puoru National Centre for Research in Music Education and Sound Arts (University of Canterbury) to project lead a professional development, action-research programme in a small cluster of primary and intermediate schools in the Canterbury region. The aim of the programme was to support teachers and students to select, utilize and develop digital resources in the teaching and learning of visual arts and music for improved educational outcomes. This Professional Development project complemented another two Ministry projects in ICT and the Arts (2006): A Scoping of Digital Resources to Support Arts Learning; and a Review of Literature on the Impact of ICT on Arts Learning. Both of these projects influenced the design and outcomes of this PD project in that they informed the participants about the positive impact of ICT on student motivation and engagement, and helped guide teachers to relevant sites that would support their teaching and learning programmes.

The schools were approached by the Research Centre at the University of Canterbury to participate in the programme because they had all previously been involved in both ICT and Arts professional development programmes operating out of Teacher Support Services at the Christchurch College of Education. School Principals, in consultation with the project leader and their own staff, agreed contractually to participation in the programme. Human Ethics approval was sought and granted by the University of Canterbury to ensure research procedures were adhered to and that permissions were gained from teachers, parents and students alike for their participation and for publication of materials produced in the programme.

Two National Facilitators in the Arts, who also worked as local music and visual arts advisors, participated in the professional development programme by working with the teachers at the contracted schools to support their arts teaching. They had worked with these teachers in previous Arts professional development programmes and had built strong professional relationships prior to this project.

The various classroom programmes were negotiated and planned in term 1, both individually and collectively with all participating schools. They were further refined and developed in term 2 again, individually and collectively. Implementation of the units generally took place in terms 3 and 4 and included shared reflections through face-to-face meetings, online e-journals, and video conferencing. Throughout the programme, action research supported reflective practice and allowed for refinements based on reflections. Teachers were given funded release time to plan, search sites and experiment with software, and to attend whole day meetings where progress and ideas were shared with all involved. Readings and key findings from both the Literature Review and the Scoping Project were shared with participants at focus group meetings for the PD project. At times, selected students attended these whole day meetings so that their views and creative work could be shared with others.

Throughout the year the two arts advisors worked alongside the teachers and their students providing expert advice on planning and pedagogy for improved arts learning outcomes. Other expert support was provided through the South Learning Centre staff and by community artists who shared their experience and knowledge of ICT and/or Arts during sessions run in the computer suite at the South Learning Centre, or through visits to galleries, or �special guest� visits to the classroom.

Visual Arts Advisor Helen Moore

In 2006 the New Zealand Ministry of Education contracted Te Puna Puoru National Centre for Research in Music Education and Sound Arts (University of Canterbury) to project lead a professional development, action-research programme in a small cluster of primary and intermediate schools in the Canterbury region. The aim of the programme was to support teachers and students to select, utilize and develop digital resources in the teaching and learning of visual arts and music for improved educational outcomes. This Professional Development project complemented another two Ministry projects in ICT and the Arts (2006): A Scoping of Digital Resources to Support Arts Learning; and a Review of Literature on the Impact of ICT on Arts Learning. Both of these projects influenced the design and outcomes of this PD project in that they informed the participants about the positive impact of ICT on student motivation and engagement, and helped guide teachers to relevant sites that would support their teaching and learning programmes.

The schools were approached by the Research Centre at the University of Canterbury to participate in the programme because they had all previously been involved in both ICT and Arts professional development programmes operating out of Teacher Support Services at the Christchurch College of Education. School Principals, in consultation with the project leader and their own staff, agreed contractually to participation in the programme. Human Ethics approval was sought and granted by the University of Canterbury to ensure research procedures were adhered to and that permissions were gained from teachers, parents and students alike for their participation and for publication of materials produced in the programme.

Two National Facilitators in the Arts, who also worked as local music and visual arts advisors, participated in the professional development programme by working with the teachers at the contracted schools to support their arts teaching. They had worked with these teachers in previous Arts professional development programmes and had built strong professional relationships prior to this project.

The various classroom programmes were negotiated and planned in term 1, both individually and collectively with all participating schools. They were further refined and developed in term 2 again, individually and collectively. Implementation of the units generally took place in terms 3 and 4 and included shared reflections through face-to-face meetings, online e-journals, and video conferencing. Throughout the programme, action research supported reflective practice and allowed for refinements based on reflections. Teachers were given funded release time to plan, search sites and experiment with software, and to attend whole day meetings where progress and ideas were shared with all involved. Readings and key findings from both the Literature Review and the Scoping Project were shared with participants at focus group meetings for the PD project. At times, selected students attended these whole day meetings so that their views and creative work could be shared with others.

Throughout the year the two arts advisors worked alongside the teachers and their students providing expert advice on planning and pedagogy for improved arts learning outcomes. Other expert support was provided through the South Learning Centre staff and by community artists who shared their experience and knowledge of ICT and/or Arts during sessions run in the computer suite at the South Learning Centre, or through visits to galleries, or �special guest� visits to the classroom.

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